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Tchaikovsky, Part I

This week we'll explore the world and music of the great Russian Romantic, including his symphonies, ballets and life at the Moscow Conservatory.

 
Program 1

Bill launches into the first of a two part series on Tchaikovsky. We hear a bit from Mikhail Glinka, who broke from the Italian school to invent the Russian school of music. And we hear from young Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who was set apart from Russia's Mighty Handful by his European training. 

Glinka: Kamarinskaya
Pittsburg Symphony/Steinberg
EMI 67249
4:21

Tchaikovsky: Impromptu in E-flat Major, Op. 1 No. 2
Boyev, p.
Etcetera 1164
5:56

Tchaikovsky: Scherzo a la Russe, Op. 1 No. 1
Wild, p.
Ivory Classics 64405-70901
5:17

Tchaikovsky: String Quartet in B-flat Major
Borodin Quartet
Teldec 90422
13:28

Tchaikovsky: The Storm (Groza) Op. 76
Detroit Symphony/Järvi
Chan 9587
13:11

Tchaikovsky arr. Riley: “None But the Lonely Heart,” Op. 6 No. 6
Philharmonia Orch/Domingo; Domingo, ten.
EMI 55018
3:10

Program 2

Bill backtracks to provide more biographical information on Tchaikovsky before playing two of Tchaikovsky’s three “Souvenir de Hapsal” for piano. We close with Tchaikovsky’s first symphony, called “Winter Dreams.”  

Tchaikovsky: Souvenir de Hapsal Op. 2 No. 1: The Castle Ruins
Boyev, p.
Etcetera 1164
5:13

Tchaikovsky arr. Kreisler: Souvenir de Hapsal, Op. 2 No. 3: Song Without Words
A. Sitkovetsky, v.; O. Sitkovetsky, p.
Angel 57025
3:06

Tchaikovsky: “A Summer Love Tale,” Op. 6 No. 2
DeGaetani, ms.; Kalish, p.
Arab 6674
2:39

Tchaikovsky: “Otchevo (Why?),”Op. 6 No. 5
Leiferkus, bar.; Skigin, p.
Conifer 51268
2:59

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 1 in g minor, Winter Dreams
NY Phil/Bernstein
Sony 47631
11:51, 20:34

 

Program 3

We hear a bit more of Tchaikovsky’s romantic life. Bill plays Romance in F Minor, dedicated to Belgian soprano Desiree Artot. Her marriage to another man influenced Tchaikovsky’s music for some time afterward. We finish with music from Tchaikovsky’s second symphony. 

Tchaikovsky: Romance in f minor, Op. 5
Pletnev, p.
Phil 456931
6:27

Tchaikovsky: String Quartet No. 1 in D Major, Op. 11, I & II
Borodin Quartet
Chan 9871
18:01

Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Nikolai Rubinstein’s Saint’s Day
LSO/Simon
Chan 9190
3:06

Tchaikovsky: Morceaux for Piano, Op. 10 (excerpt)
Laredo, p.
Essay 1026
1:59

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 2 in c minor, Op. 17, I & III
CSO/Abbado
CBS 39359
16:01

 

Program 4

We open with excerpts from The Snow Maiden, incidental music for a Russian play. We also hear incidental music from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, “Do You Hear the Nightingale?"  Bill ends with Tchaikovsky’s Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1, one of his most famous pieces. 

Tchaikovsky: The Snow Maiden (excerpts)
Detroit Symphony Orchestra/Järvi
Chan 9324
1:39, 5:29

Mussorgsky: Dawn on the Moscow River fr. Khovanshchina
LSO/Solti
Decca 460977
5:00

Tchaikovsky: “Do You Hear the Nightingale?” fr. Romeo & Juliet
Scottish Nat’l Orch/Järvi; Lewis, ten.; Murphy, s.
Chan 8476
13:04

Tchaikovsky: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in b flat minor, I
RCA Symphony Orch/Kondrashin; Cliburn, p.
RCA 55912
20:43

Program 5

Bill picks back up with the second and third movements of Tchaikovsky’s Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1. We also hear from the Sérénade Mélancolique and excerpts of Swan Lake.

Tchaikovsky: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in bflat minor, I (excerpt)
RCA Symphony Orch/Kondrashin; Cliburn, p.
RCA 55912
:46

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1, II & III
Berlin Phil/Abbado; Argerich, p.
DG 449816
13:28

Tchaikovsky: Sérénade Mélancolique, Op. 26
LA Phil/Wallenstein; Heifetz, v.
BMG 60927
6:26

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29, Polish, V (+ IV excerpt)
Philharmonia Orch/Muti
Brilliant Cl 99792
7:50 + 2:17

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake Suite, Op. 20a (excerpts)
Vienna Phil/Levine
DG 437806
20:59

 

 

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