The wfmt radio network

2005 Archive

 

December

 

December 26 - 30, 2005

Venice: The Glories of  –  Exploring Music focuses on sounds of the city, water, and love in Venice. Bill opens this week with, “Why Venice?”, the magical city that inspired music of the late Renaissance, Baroque, and the beginning of Italian Opera. Monteverdi, Palestrina, Vivaldi, Palestrina and Verdi will be featured.

 

December 19 - 23, 2005

Bach Christmas Oratorio – An exploration of the six cantatas performed in Leipzig’s St. Thomas and St. Nicholas churches in December 1734. These six Bach cantatas were written to correspond with the days of the Lutheran church year, and are collectively referred to as the "Christmas Oratorio". We start the week with Cantata No. 1 (For the First Day of Christmas) and we will end with Cantata No. 6 for Epiphany.

 

December 12 - 16, 2005

It Takes Two to Tango – This week, we will explore the world of musical duos. First, we will listen to instruments working in tandem to obtain unexpected performances. Then we will focus on composers who collaborated or worked against each other such as Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart. We’ll also savor the great love duets of Verdi, Puccini, and Wagner.

 

December 5 - 9, 2005

George Frideric Handel – We’ll have a week-long look at the life and music of England’s most celebrated German composer. Handel has been regarded as on of the greatest composers of the Baroque era with many of his works played every year since their first hearing almost 400 hundred years ago.

 

November

 

November 28 - December 2, 2005

Symphony, Part I –  In the beginning, there were Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, or so we thought.  That is until we uncovered a whole world of instrumental music so varied, so wonderful and so woefully unknown, we decided to take out time in that glorious place.  Starting with a Sinfonia by Biaggio Marini from 1618, we slowly make out way through the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century and finish at the brink of the Romantic era with the Second Symphony by Beethoven.

 

November 21 - 25, 2005

Family Matters: All in the Family – Musicians, are like that proverbial apple, they too do not fall far from the tree. With musicians marry musicians their children are bound to be musical. This week features composers and their kin, including the Bachs, Scarlattis, Schumanns and others.

 

November 14 - 18, 2005

Beethoven and that Danged Metronome – The tempo and interpretation affect the emotional impact of a composition thus changing its entire character. Beethoven was notorious for his metronome markings, and this week we learn the significant role those little numbers played. We'll also take a brief detour and examine how other composers, like Bach, Handel, Shostakovich worked with tempi in their music.

 

November 7 - 11, 2005

Claude Debussy – Claude Debussy, who once said he learned more from poets and painters than from the music conservatory, is considered the figurehead of Impressionist music (though he would vehemently argue against it).  Influenced by Bach's arabesques and the romantic Chopin, the Frenchman made his mark in music with his otherworldly compositions, beginning with "Danse Bohemienne". While we listen to his compositions Bill reflects on Debussy's peculiar upbringing, studies in the Paris conservatory, and his Prix de Rome win.

 

October

 

October 31 - November 4, 2005

Variations – Exploring Themes and Variations. In one of his pensees, Pascal says, “That man lives between the abyss of the infinitely large and the abyss of the infinitely small. The voyage of variations leads to the other infinitude, into the infinite diversity of the interior world lying hidden in all things.” Bill leads us on this voyage through a theme and it’s variations.

 

October 24 - 28, 2005

Latin Carnival – From Padilla and Ponce to Ginastera, Villa-Lobos and Piazzolla, we’re celebrating music by Latin-American composers.

 

October 17 - 21, 2005

Tone Poems – In a literal case of art imitating life, symphonic music is freed from its traditional structures and takes a programmatic turn. Generally one movement, Tone Poem’s illustrate or describe with music a poem, a painting or other non musical source. Bill invites us to sit with him as he describes and listens to this image evoking dramatic music.

 

October 10 - 14, 2005

An Intelligent Conversion : String Quartets – Goethe once wrote, “When I listen to a string quartet, it makes me feel as if I am eavesdropping on a conversation between four intelligent people.”  This week we are going to listen to string quartets composed over a period of about two and a half centuries. From Joseph Haydn, the father of the string quartet, all the way to Aaron Jay Kernis, a Pulitzer prize-winning present-day composer.

 

October 3 - 7, 2005

Benjamin Britten – Called "the great communicator", Benjamin Britten’s works such as "Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra," Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, "Peter Grimes" and the "War Requiem" are edgy and accessible.

 

September

 

September 26 - 30, 2005

Families of Instruments – This week we will explore the sections of the modern orchestra, instruments that are hit, plucked, blown through, fingered, and bowed. Bill will point out the unique colors that are achieved by each instrument and the never-ending combination of sounds from the strings, winds, brass, percussion, and keyboards.

 

September 19 - 23, 2005

Fit for a King – This relationship between the King and his musical subjects was intimate deep and lasted for hundreds if not thousands of years. From Bach to Bridge this week we will listen to the rich and intriguing world of the European court composer.

 

September 12 - 16, 2005

Russian Five: The Mighty Handful – Five composers from St. Petersburg who sought to create a uniquely Russian musical identity.  We'll hear compositions by Rimsky-Korsakov, Cui, Borodin, Balakirev, and Mussorgsky.

 

September 5 - 9, 2005

John Corigliano – Bill McGlaughlin welcomes one of America’s foremost composers as Exploring Music’s co-host and programmer.  Corigliano, son of the longtime concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, has written many works that are now considered to be part of the standard repertoire for American violinists, clarinetists and orchestras. During the '80s with the onslaught of AIDS deaths surrounding Corigliano, he expressed this profound loss in his Symphony No. 1 with a tarantella that evokes feelings of complete madness.

 

August

 

August 29 - September 2, 2005

Music for the Masses – No, we're not talking about the proletariat--this is music set to the traditional Latin Mass of the Roman Catholic liturgy, which expands over 800 years from the earliest of composers to the most modern.

 

August 22 - 26, 2005

Mozart at His Zenith – A week devoted to Mozart’s final years.  We’ll explore a stream of masterpieces, including Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, the final symphonies and piano concertos, and his unfinished Requiem.

 

August 15 - 19, 2005

Mozart: Bright Lights, Big City – Mozart gets the boot from the Archbishop and moves from his hometown of Salzburg to the music capital of Vienna. This cosmopolitan world opened Mozart’s eyes and ears to a creative world that he expresses so beautifully in his music.

 

August 8 - 12, 2005

Get the Picture? – Begin hearing your way through plenty of famous paintings and poems. Listen to self-portraits of visual artists like Francisco Goya, through his own fingerings on the guitar. Music inspired by the visual arts, including Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, Hindemith’s Mathis der Maler, and Rachmaninoff’s Isle of the Dead.

 

August 1 - 5, 2005

Ralph Vaughan-Williams – Composer of nine masterful symphonies, editor of the English Hymnal, an ambulance driver in WWI and great-nephew to Charles Darwin, Ralph Vaughan Williams was a prolific and intriguing figure who was at the vanguard of English music in the early 20th century.  This week, we'll look at his life and sample his music.

 

July

 

July 25 - 29, 2005

Water Music – In the 5th Century BC, water was classified as one of the four essential elements.  Over the centuries artists, poets, philosophers and composers have returned again and again to the mysteries of water for inspiration. This week, we’ll focus on Water Music with works by Vaughan Williams, Mahler, Debussy and (of course) Handel.

 

July 18 - 22, 2005

Ninth Symphony – The curse of the ninth! Why did so many of music’s great symphonists die after completing their Ninth Symphony?  We’ll sample five landmark compositions:  the Ninth symphonies of Beethoven, Schubert, Bruckner, Dvorak and Mahler.

 

July 11 - 15, 2005

Maiden Voyages – A composer’s first symphony can bring on the hardest challenges and greatest rewards. This week, we take a look at three composers’ maiden voyages out into deep, musical oceans. Bill explores the trials and tribulations that Haydn, Beethoven, and Mendelssohn experienced while composing their first symphonic works.

 

July 4 - 8, 2005

I Hear America Singing – As our nation turns our minds and hearts to vote we here at Exploring Music celebrate America's unique voice in music. Bill takes on the music and poetry of America, from Walt Whitman to Aaron Copland

 

June

 

June 27 - July 1, 2005

Bach Sleeps in on Sundays – Bach spent most of his life in serve to the Lutheran Church and his God, but he did write secular music too. Here we focus on a five year period of Bach’s life, the time in which he worked for Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Kothen. The cello suites, the violin sonatas and partitas, and the Brandenberg concerti were all composed by Bach, in this five year period.

 

June 20 - 24, 2005

Schubertiade, Part I – What a scene in Vienna:  business owners, intellectuals and scholars offering their home for a concert, a meal, a place to sleep or a room with a piano—all to support the friend they loved and admired, Franz Schubert.  It was a Bohemian life, rich with music and conversation.  This week, we’ll dip into those legendary house concerts for an enchanting week of chamber music.

 

June 13 - 17, 2005

Nationalism – Nationalism on its own is a dangerous force, but it has led to a number of wonderful bits of music. This edition of Exploring Music examines what happens when a powerful pride in national identity winds its way into a composer's head.

 

June 6 - 10, 2005

Richard Strauss – Richard Strauss – whose musical life spanned nine decades, two world wars, and the Third Reich – was one of Germany’s most gifted and controversial figures.  We’ll explore his tone poems, operas, and both his public and private lives. We end this five-part biography with his four last songs performed by Jessye Norman.

 

May

 

May 30 - June 3, 2005

Music in Time of War – Pieces inspired by, reacting to, written in memoriam for, or written in protest to war. This week’s program will focus on composers' reactions to armed conflict, including the great War Requiem by Benjamin Britten.  We'll also feature music by Beethoven, Haydn and Shostakovich.

 

May 23 - 27, 2005

Wagner's Ring Cycle – For most operas, a 5-hour survey would more than cover every measure, every note – but not this one, Wagner’s crowning achievement of four epic operas. Bill helps us understand and enjoy this epic journey with richly textured music that continues to grow in complexity as the cycle proceeds. Wagner spent over a twenty-six years writing the libretto and composing the music that follows the struggles and drama of gods, heroes, and mythical creatures.

 

May 16 - 20, 2005

Invitation to the Dance, Part II – This week, we’ll focus on ballet music by Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, Schubert – even Beethoven! On Wednesday’s program alone we will dance to Bartok’s Miraculous Mandarin Suite and The Wooden Prince, Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty, and a charming suite of dances from Manuel de Falla’s Three-Cornered Hat.

 

May 9 - 12, 2006

Roaring 20s – In the 1920s, concert halls rocked with everything from jazz to airplane propellers and radio became a multi-billion dollar industry. Art and literature flowed like bathtub gin.  Sampling music from “The Roaring 20s” in New York, Paris, and Berlin. We’ll start this week in New York with the 1926 Metropolitan Opera premiere of John Alden Carpenter’s ballet Skyscrapers, and end the week in the then-troubled city of Berlin with the early works of Kurt Weill.

 

May 2 - 6, 2005

Robert Schumann – A biography of the torrid and life of one of Germany’s early romantics. Married to composer/pianist Clara Wieck, and a friend to Johannes Brahms, Felix Mendelssohn, and Joseph Joachim, Schumann was at the very heart of the German Romantic intellectual movement in the mid 19th century. He was a composer, pianist, and music critic.

 

April

 

April 25 - 29, 2005

Soundtracks – 

Since the beginning of cinematography classical music has been there to enhance the narrative and drama of the silver screen. For the next five days we will listen to the music composed for the films ET, Zorba the Greek, and Robin Hood plus many more great musical scores.

 

April 18 - 22, 2005

Hidden Gold, Part II – Have you ever had a friend steer you toward terrific music you’d never heard before? This week, Bill has solicited suggestions from a number of radio friends for great pieces of music that almost never get played. Join us for a Celtic Symphony by Bantock and lesser known pieces by Mahler, Wagner, Rodrigo. Get ready to discover your next favorite piece of music!

 

April 11 - 15, 2005

Under the Hood, Part I – How does this thing work?  For some of us, the inner workings of a symphony are as inscrutable as the engine of an automobile is to others.  Bill McGlaughlin lifts the “bonnet” or hood on a handful of symphonies to explore the mechanics of large-scale compositions. Join us as we take a closer look at works by Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky and Sibelius

 

April 4 - 8, 2005

Aaron Copland – For some, Aaron Copland conjures images of covered wagons and endless frontiers.  For others, he evokes Olympic athletes, astronauts and fallen heroes.  From waves of grain to stars and stripes, Aaron Copland defined the soundtrack to everything American.  This week, we’ll trace his trek from the heart of Brooklyn to the heart of a nation.  Featured works include Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Fanfare for the Common Man and Billy the Kid.

 

March

 

March 28 - April 1, 2005

Clowning Around – This week's focus is musical buffoonery!  Music is a language, and like all others it has its jokes, witticisms, and puns. For composers, clowning around with music takes the same skills as writing a great symphony. And, these fun, charming works show the genius of the composers who have written them.

 

March 21 - 25, 2005

Spring is Here – Spring is in the air as we celebrate the coming of flowers and sunshine from under the melting winter ice here on Exploring Music. We will hear Spring from Vivaldi Four Seasons, Beethoven’s Spring Sonata, Strauss, and this time of year can’t be complete without a little rain, so from Chopin, Prelude in D flat, Op. 28 No. 15, or commonly known as “the Raindrop”.

 

March 14 - 18, 2005

España – Bill takes on the confluence of cultures, languages and terrains that comprise the country of Spain. Starting with religious music of early Spain during a time in which Islam, Judaism and Christianity existed side by side to 1492, when the Jews and Moors of Spain were forced out. Then we continue through the next 400 hundred years and this week concludes with music from present day Spain.

 

March 7 - 11, 2005

An Intelligent Conversion : String Quartets – Goethe once wrote, “When I listen to a string quartet, it makes me feel as if I am eavesdropping on a conversation between four intelligent people.”  This week we are going to listen to string quartets composed over a period of about two and a half centuries. From Joseph Haydn, the father of the string quartet, all the way to Aaron Jay Kernis, a Pulitzer prize-winning present-day composer.

 

February

 

February 28 - March 4, 2005

Edward Elgar – There’s much more to Edward Elgar than graduation marches and the Enigma Variations. A composer of equally masterful symphonies, oratorios, chamber music, and concertos, he led a renaissance in 20th century England that firmly reestablished the country's musical identity.

 

February 21 - 25, 2005

Tone Poems – In a literal case of art imitating life, symphonic music is freed from its traditional structures and takes a programmatic turn. Generally one movement, Tone Poem’s illustrate or describe with music a poem, a painting or other non musical source. Bill invites us to sit with him as he describes and listens to this image evoking dramatic music.

 

February 14 - 18, 2005

Hit or Myth – The Gods must be crazy!  This week, we’ll survey the trials and tribulations of mortals and immortals, brought to life by the likes of Berlioz, Gluck, Handel and more.

 

February 7 - 11, 2005

Shakespeare – We’ll sample from the wealth of music inspired by the Bard’s verse, including a suite from Mendelssohn’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and excerpts from William Walton’s film score to the film “Henry the V”.  Bill also finds time to fit in a few different musical interpretations from the timeless legend of Romeo and Juliet.

 

January

 

January 31 - February 4, 2005

Claude Debussy – Claude Debussy, who once said he learned more from poets and painters than from the music conservatory, is considered the figurehead of Impressionist music (though he would vehemently argue against it).  Influenced by Bach's arabesques and the romantic Chopin, the Frenchman made his mark in music with his otherworldly compositions, beginning with "Danse Bohemienne". While we listen to his compositions Bill reflects on Debussy's peculiar upbringing, studies in the Paris conservatory, and his Prix de Rome win.

 

January 24 - 28, 2005

Beethoven and the Piano – 200 years after the composition of Beethoven’s five Piano Concertos, they’re still the giants of the piano world.  Join us for a concerto a day, plus some of his more intimate works for the instrument.

 

January 17 - 21, 2005

A Little Traveling Music, Please – Wanderers, farewells, and sightseeing; people are always on the go. This week, Bill calls up, “A Little Traveling Music, Please” from the pens of Handel, Smetana, Duke Ellington, and more. Reflections from such travels infuse themselves into their works, as we will discover throughout the week. We will hear selections from Beethoven’s Les Adieux, Schubert’s Die Schöne Mullerin,  and Haydn’s Farewell Symphony.

 

January 10 - 14, 2005

Don't Shoot the Piano Player – Sit back and relax.  This week, we’re rolling out some of the delights of the chamber world. We’ll hear some of the most beloved works of chamber music, first enjoyed through intimate gatherings around the piano.  Featured composers include Mozart, Beethoven, Dvorák and Brahms.

 

January 3 - 7, 2005

Felix Mendelssohn – German composer Felix Mendelssohn finds himself at the center of this week's episode of Exploring Music. Hailed as one of the greatest musical minds of all time we venture from his precocious youth to his early death. His great body of work is still in the repertoires of opera companies, chamber groups, and orchestras. And, it’s the Mendelssohn violin concerto that is at very heart of every violinist.

 

The Exploring Music streaming website is made possible by Mr. & Mrs. William Gardner Brown and Susan & Richard Kiphart.
You have opened up the world of Classical Music to me, where previously, it seemed too complicated.
Steffen Demeter
This is simply one of the very best radio programmes in the medium!...The study of the people, the times, and the events that inform the music we otherwise enjoy and even, heaven forbid, take for granted, brings the entire world of the music and the composer to life.
Walther Davies
There isn't a program you broadcast on Exploring Music" that isn't of interest. I find them all engaging. It is a combination of variety of subject, intellectual curiosity and your obvious enthusiasm which characterize your satisfying programs.
Michael Sanders
It’s a great way to re-engage myself with consciousness before heading off to work.
Kourtney
I Love this program! I am in 7th grade and I am the complete opposite of the other kids. I am 4th chair in the orchestra and I love to read. But most of all, I LOVE classical music!
Claudia Wertz
Your show has helped open my mind and heart to this world of music, and every show I hear confirms my place in music and gives me new ideas for where I'd like to go with it in the future….I grew up with classical music as a child and always held it in my heart, but I didn't have the confidence to be a good student (or a good violinist.)
Christine Anderson
Listening to you is almost interactive.You invite us in with so many well modulated dramatic and informative comments, enticing, enthusiastic interpretations, and coherent, beautiful presentations. It's a privilege to follow you into the musical space you create.
Sally Rosenbaum
I just love this program. It is soothing and comfortable at the end of the day. I find his comments interesting, but they aren't so dragged out that there is very little music. The balance of both is just right.
Jean Quay
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