The wfmt radio network

2017 Archive

March

 

March 20 - 24, 2017

Virtuoso, The World of – What distinguishes a virtuoso from a merely great musician?  This week we feature these musicians who had it all.  We start  in the 16th century with the development of violin and keyboard instruments that brought the rise of the virtuoso. Composers created music for artists who claimed these instruments as their own. Generations of musicians forever challenged and one-upped those who led the way, playing concertos to delight us. Join Bill as he follows his ear through the centuries from Sephardic composer Thomas Lupo, played by violinist Andrew Manze, through Niccolò Paganini performed by Michael Rabin, to the present day with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra playing The Octet for Wind Instruments by Igor Stravinsky.

 

March 13 - 17, 2017

Music for the Masses – No, we're not talking about the proletariat--this is music set to the great Latin Masses, which expand over 800 years from the earliest of composers to the most modern.

 

March 6 - 10, 2017

Russian Five: The Mighty Handful – Five prominent composers; Balakirev, Mussorgsky, Cui, Borodin, and Rimsky-Korsakov all worked to help form the Russian National School of Composers, which later was named The New Russian School. These five composers, led by Mily Balakirev, all lived in Saint Petersburg and collaborated from 1856 to 1870. Throughout these programs Bill will research each of these composers and demonstrate some of their most prominent works.

 

February

 

February 27 - March 3, 2017

Family Matters: All in the Family – Musicians, are like that proverbial apple, they too do not fall far from the tree. With musicians marry musicians their children are bound to be musical. This week features composers and their kin, including the Bachs, Scarlattis, Schumanns and others.

 

February 20 - 24, 2017

Soundtracks – Since the beginning of cinematography, classical music has been there to enhance the narrative and drama of the silver screen. For the next five days we will listen to the soundtracks composed for the films E.T., Zorba the Greek, and Robin Hood, plus many more great musical scores.

 

February 13 - 17, 2017

Yin and Yang, the Play of Opposites, Part 2  – This week we continue to hold on to the dragon’s tail listening to the pull of musical opposites. Starting with Samuel Barber and Francisco Tárrega, only Bill knows where this week's musical yin and yang will end! Heaven, Earth, or the abyss!

 

February 6 - 10, 2017

Yin and Yang, the Play of Opposites, Part 1 – The idea for this two-week exploration came from a listener who suggested we explore music of "great calm", music which seems to gently pick us up and float us away from this earth. Bill liked the idea very much and immediately started sketching a week of the Romantics, from Berlioz to Mahler. But as he went along, he started to feel a tug in the opposite direction — what about music that picks up and drives us like a mad coachmen, hurtling us toward conclusion or chaos, music of sound and fury and joy and lots of noise? And so, here we are: The Play of Opposites. Think of Frost's Fire or Ice, or Eliot's Bang or Whimper. Opposites, it seems, may contain the whole.

 

January

 

January 30 - February 3, 2017

Grieg and SibeliusWe’ll explore the lives and music of the two Scandinavian greats: Edvard Grieg and Jean Sibelius.  Music spanning almost one hundred years includes a number of chamber works, Grieg’s Peer Gynt, the Norwegian Dances and several Sibelius symphonies.

 

January 23 - 27, 2017

Mozart Piano Concertos – This week we will explore Mozart’s piano concerti and all of the relationships that influenced him, especially his one with Johann Christian Bach. While exploring various sounds, the teenage Mozart was so heavily inspired by J.C. Bach's writing that he made it his own. Bach and Mozart bonded over music, as well as over tricky keyboard games.

 

January 16 - 20, 2017

Aaron Copland – For some, Aaron Copland conjures images of covered wagons and endless frontiers.  For others, he evokes Olympic athletes, astronauts and fallen heroes.  From waves of grain to stars and stripes, Aaron Copland defined the soundtrack to everything American.  This week, we’ll trace his trek from the heart of Brooklyn to the heart of a nation.  Featured works include Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Fanfare for the Common Man and Billy the Kid.

 

January 9 - 13, 2017

Haydn Symphonies – Dear old Papa Haydn, as he was known in 18th century Vienna, was a fatherly figure to the finest musicians of his day.  He is also the father of the symphonic form.  This week we’ll sample some of his 104 symphonies, following their development from modest orchestral pieces to expressions of wit, humor, and drama.

 

January 2 - 6, 2017

Listeners’ Choice III – Your emails arrive in our comment box with wonderful musical requests! This week Bill features your email comments with music that you asked to hear. This includes a festival overture from a little-known Australian composer, fun transcriptions and original works for trombone, plus more. Monday never sounded better!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Exploring Music streaming website is made possible by Mr. & Mrs. William Gardner Brown and Susan & Richard Kiphart.

Thanks to Oxford Music Online, the home of Grove® Music Online and the access point for other Oxford online music reference subscriptions.

You have opened up the world of Classical Music to me, where previously, it seemed too complicated.
Steffen Demeter
This is simply one of the very best radio programmes in the medium!...The study of the people, the times, and the events that inform the music we otherwise enjoy and even, heaven forbid, take for granted, brings the entire world of the music and the composer to life.
Walther Davies
There isn't a program you broadcast on Exploring Music" that isn't of interest. I find them all engaging. It is a combination of variety of subject, intellectual curiosity and your obvious enthusiasm which characterize your satisfying programs.
Michael Sanders
It’s a great way to re-engage myself with consciousness before heading off to work.
Kourtney
I Love this program! I am in 7th grade and I am the complete opposite of the other kids. I am 4th chair in the orchestra and I love to read. But most of all, I LOVE classical music!
Claudia Wertz
Your show has helped open my mind and heart to this world of music, and every show I hear confirms my place in music and gives me new ideas for where I'd like to go with it in the future….I grew up with classical music as a child and always held it in my heart, but I didn't have the confidence to be a good student (or a good violinist.)
Christine Anderson
Listening to you is almost interactive.You invite us in with so many well modulated dramatic and informative comments, enticing, enthusiastic interpretations, and coherent, beautiful presentations. It's a privilege to follow you into the musical space you create.
Sally Rosenbaum
I just love this program. It is soothing and comfortable at the end of the day. I find his comments interesting, but they aren't so dragged out that there is very little music. The balance of both is just right.
Jean Quay
Newsletters Thank You!